0

BOOKMARKS

0

READ

132

DOWNLOADS

592

VIEWS

0

REVIEWS

ENGLISH

ENGLISH

Gender and Sexuality in the Importance of Being Ernest and Marriage of Anansewa

By Nnadi Adaeze

Summary

In conclusion the aim of this essay, there have been a scrutiny of the means in which gender and sexuality have been presented in the two comic works of Oscar Wilde and Efua Sutherland, pointing out the similarity and variation among the two playwrights. Of course humans vary in trait and composure, but the sort of picture painted about them is dependent on the philosophy of these individual writers.

Gender and Sexuality in the Importance of Being Ernest and Marriage of Anansewa
 
0.0 (0 reviews)

Published: July 20, 2017

Uploaded by: Nnadi Adaeze

Read Online

Your download will begin automatically, if it's taking too long click here

Share this entry

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The treatment of gender and sexuality in literature has been an endless attention among diverse writers of all times. Meanwhile, the representation of  both male and female goes beyond equal status and perception due to contrasts in views of writers about man and woman. And based on this understanding, a radical feminist known as Judith Butler, argues in literary theory of gender and sexuality about the misery women specifically face in representation. She, Butler, posits that feminists have made a mistake by claiming that ‘women are a unit with similar characteristics and interests (Routledge Press, 1990). She still goes on to believe that this approach has reinforced a binary view of gender regulations in which people are separated into two clear cut groups, men and women.

            Gender and sexuality as equal concepts can also be broken into three categories based on the observation of Sam Killerman. These are gender identity, gender expression and biological sex. And these categories are another way of breaking down gender into the different social, biological and cultural constructions. At this point, we tend to state the aim of this writing which is the means in which Oscar Wilde and Efua Sutherland present gender and sexuality in their respective comic works, The Importance of  Being Ernest and The Marriage of Anansewa. 

            As a satire on the Victorian England and its life, The Importance of Being Ernest presents women as conscious agents of class mannerism, and a certain quality among the members of the upper class, especially among the young men. Jack Worthing is constantly thought by Gwendolen and Cecily to be the so-called Ernest, having known fully well that ‘Ernestness’ is a common quality expected from a young man who wishes to involve himself into marital contract with an exalted family in the society. Wilde, through this way, tells his audience that women are expectants of an ideal life from men. And to the attentive reader, this serves to be the inferior women place on themselves as they exclude themselves from this near-to-perfect strength and quality from a man.

            Even Mrs. Bracknell’s quest to assess the financial and social standard of Jack when the latter wants to ask for Cecily’s hand in marriage depicts a sort of perfect expectation from men. However, this is a means Wilde employs through women to assess man’s worth and the essence of the masculinity in him. Unlike Gwendolen and Cecily, Anansewa,  inspite of the demands  of  African tradition, never hoped of an ideal life from the four suitors her father extorts from. She is presented to be neutral to such expectations that Wilde’s females are immersed into.

            Wilde also depicts the female gender as intelligent and sensitive to man’s quest in the character of Mrs. Bracknell observes the romantic advances of Jack while he is in their house and asks Cecily to leave their presence in order for her (Mrs Bracknell) to scrutinize Jack’s worth before he is to be engaged to Cecily. Sutherland also portrays this trait in Anansewa as she observes that her father, Ananse wants to marry her off to the local chiefs. Then, she questions the father about his intent. This proves the masculinity in women too.

            Within the two texts, the audience also pictures the female gender being restricted from her decision and as a result of this, she is employed as a competent tod for the exploitation of man’s desire by the parents. For instance, Mrs. Bracknell objects Cecily’s feelings for Jack Worthing until she (Mrs. Bracknell) is done with her assessment of Jack’s social stand, and through this aim, Jack’s standard of living is exposed to the knowledge of the audience because Mrs. Bracknell believes that an eighteen-year old girl like Cecily cannot be given to a wretched man who will not maintain or make provision for her needs considering the class she belongs to in the society. While on the part of Anansewa, her father extorts monetary and material gifts from the four local chiefs with the promises of marriage to all of them. When she gets aware of this development, her reaction is suppressed by George Kweku Ananse’s claims that they various funds from the chief have been the sources of her with school fees, but not knowing that Ananse desire is to enrich himself and climb the social ladder with her daughter. Then, it sounds quite obvious that women have been painted with true feminine picture.

            Then down to the representation of the male gender, Oscar Wilde informs the audience that men are vulnerable to women’s exploitations. Mrs. Bracknell exploits Jack’s desire for Cecily to know the true identity of Jack Worthing and social class. And she (Mrs. Bracknell) intends to toil with Jack’s desire when she says that Algernom should go ahead to marry Gwendolen without a corresponding approval of Jack’s marriage to Cecily if not that Jack Worthing stands his ground by objecting to Mrs. Bracknell’s  partial declaration. Wilde educates his readers that men’s desire can be object of humour when women get involved into the affair on ground. And on the contrary, Sutherland presents man as an agent of greed and deceit, and a setback and an exploiter of his fellow man in the society. George Kweku Ananse’s desire is to excessively enrich himself and attain his materialistic goals through the extortion of funds from the local chiefs whom he never as well given the chance to secure his daughter as wife. Still on this, the sort of masculinity Sutherland places within the local chiefs is perceived to degenerated in approach. None of them is perceptive enough to feel the deception lying within George Kweku Ananse’s conducts and words.

            To conclude the aim of this essay, there have been a scrutiny of the means in which gender and sexuality have been presented in the two comic works of Oscar Wilde and Efua Sutherland, pointing out the similarity and variation among the two playwrights. Of course humans vary in trait and composure, but the sort of picture painted about them is dependent on the philosophy of these individual writers.           s

INTRODUCTION

The treatment of gender and sexuality in literature has been an endless attention among diverse writers of all times. Meanwhile, the representation of  both male and female goes beyond equal status and perception due to contrasts in views of writers about man and woman. And based on this understanding, a radical feminist known as Judith Butler, argues in literary theory of gender and sexuality about the misery women specifically face in representation. She, Butler, posits that feminists have made a mistake by claiming that ‘women are a unit with similar characteristics and interests (Routledge Press, 1990). She still goes on to believe that this approach has reinforced a binary view of gender regulations in which people are separated into two clear cut groups, men and women.

            Gender and sexuality as equal concepts can also be broken into three categories based on the observation of Sam Killerman. These are gender identity, gender expression and biological sex. And these categories are another way of breaking down gender into the different social, biological and cultural constructions. At this point, we tend to state the aim of this writing which is the means in which Oscar Wilde and Efua Sutherland present gender and sexuality in their respective comic works, The Importance of  Being Ernest and The Marriage of Anansewa. 

            As a satire on the Victorian England and its life, The Importance of Being Ernest presents women as conscious agents of class mannerism, and a certain quality among the members of the upper class, especially among the young men. Jack Worthing is constantly thought by Gwendolen and Cecily to be the so-called Ernest, having known fully well that ‘Ernestness’ is a common quality expected from a young man who wishes to involve himself into marital contract with an exalted family in the society. Wilde, through this way, tells his audience that women are expectants of an ideal life from men. And to the attentive reader, this serves to be the inferior women place on themselves as they exclude themselves from this near-to-perfect strength and quality from a man.

            Even Mrs. Bracknell’s quest to assess the financial and social standard of Jack when the latter wants to ask for Cecily’s hand in marriage depicts a sort of perfect expectation from men. However, this is a means Wilde employs through women to assess man’s worth and the essence of the masculinity in him. Unlike Gwendolen and Cecily, Anansewa,  inspite of the demands  of  African tradition, never hoped of an ideal life from the four suitors her father extorts from. She is presented to be neutral to such expectations that Wilde’s females are immersed into.

            Wilde also depicts the female gender as intelligent and sensitive to man’s quest in the character of Mrs. Bracknell observes the romantic advances of Jack while he is in their house and asks Cecily to leave their presence in order for her (Mrs Bracknell) to scrutinize Jack’s worth before he is to be engaged to Cecily. Sutherland also portrays this trait in Anansewa as she observes that her father, Ananse wants to marry her off to the local chiefs. Then, she questions the father about his intent. This proves the masculinity in women too.

            Within the two texts, the audience also pictures the female gender being restricted from her decision and as a result of this, she is employed as a competent tod for the exploitation of man’s desire by the parents. For instance, Mrs. Bracknell objects Cecily’s feelings for Jack Worthing until she (Mrs. Bracknell) is done with her assessment of Jack’s social stand, and through this aim, Jack’s standard of living is exposed to the knowledge of the audience because Mrs. Bracknell believes that an eighteen-year old girl like Cecily cannot be given to a wretched man who will not maintain or make provision for her needs considering the class she belongs to in the society. While on the part of Anansewa, her father extorts monetary and material gifts from the four local chiefs with the promises of marriage to all of them. When she gets aware of this development, her reaction is suppressed by George Kweku Ananse’s claims that they various funds from the chief have been the sources of her with school fees, but not knowing that Ananse desire is to enrich himself and climb the social ladder with her daughter. Then, it sounds quite obvious that women have been painted with true feminine picture.

            Then down to the representation of the male gender, Oscar Wilde informs the audience that men are vulnerable to women’s exploitations. Mrs. Bracknell exploits Jack’s desire for Cecily to know the true identity of Jack Worthing and social class. And she (Mrs. Bracknell) intends to toil with Jack’s desire when she says that Algernom should go ahead to marry Gwendolen without a corresponding approval of Jack’s marriage to Cecily if not that Jack Worthing stands his ground by objecting to Mrs. Bracknell’s  partial declaration. Wilde educates his readers that men’s desire can be object of humour when women get involved into the affair on ground. And on the contrary, Sutherland presents man as an agent of greed and deceit, and a setback and an exploiter of his fellow man in the society. George Kweku Ananse’s desire is to excessively enrich himself and attain his materialistic goals through the extortion of funds from the local chiefs whom he never as well given the chance to secure his daughter as wife. Still on this, the sort of masculinity Sutherland places within the local chiefs is perceived to degenerated in approach. None of them is perceptive enough to feel the deception lying within George Kweku Ananse’s conducts and words.

            To conclude the aim of this essay, there have been a scrutiny of the means in which gender and sexuality have been presented in the two comic works of Oscar Wilde and Efua Sutherland, pointing out the similarity and variation among the two playwrights. Of course humans vary in trait and composure, but the sort of picture painted about them is dependent on the philosophy of these individual writers.           s

INTRODUCTION

The treatment of gender and sexuality in literature has been an endless attention among diverse writers of all times. Meanwhile, the representation of both male and female goes beyond equal status and perception due to contrasts in views of writers about man and woman. And based on this understanding, a radical feminist known as Judith Butler, argues in literary theory of gender and sexuality about the misery women specifically face in representation. She, Butler, posits that feminists have made a mistake by claiming that ‘women are a unit with similar characteristics and interests (Routledge Press, 1990). She still goes on to believe that this approach has reinforced a binary view of gender regulations in which people are separated into two clear cut groups, men and women.

Gender and sexuality as equal concepts can also be broken into three categories based on the observation of Sam Killerman. These are gender identity, gender expression and biological sex. And these categories are another way of breaking down gender into the different social, biological and cultural constructions. At this point, we tend to state the aim of this writing which is the means in which Oscar Wilde and Efua Sutherland present gender and sexuality in their respective comic works, The Importance of Being Ernest and The Marriage of Anansewa.

As a satire on the Victorian England and its life, The Importance of Being Ernest presents women as conscious agents of class mannerism, and a certain quality among the members of the upper class, especially among the young men. Jack Worthing is constantly thought by Gwendolen and Cecily to be the so-called Ernest, having known fully well that ‘Ernestness’ is a common quality expected from a young man who wishes to involve himself into marital contract with an exalted family in the society. Wilde, through this way, tells his audience that women are expectants of an ideal life from men. And to the attentive reader, this serves to be the inferior women place on themselves as they exclude themselves from this near-to-perfect strength and quality from a man.

Even Mrs. Bracknell’s quest to assess the financial and social standard of Jack when the latter wants to ask for Cecily’s hand in marriage depicts a sort of perfect expectation from men. However, this is a means Wilde employs through women to assess man’s worth and the essence of the masculinity in him. Unlike Gwendolen and Cecily, Anansewa, inspite of the demands of African tradition, never hoped of an ideal life from the four suitors her father extorts from. She is presented to be neutral to such expectations that Wilde’s females are immersed into.

Wilde also depicts the female gender as intelligent and sensitive to man’s quest in the character of Mrs. Bracknell observes the romantic advances of Jack while he is in their house and asks Cecily to leave their presence in order for her (Mrs Bracknell) to scrutinize Jack’s worth before he is to be engaged to Cecily. Sutherland also portrays this trait in Anansewa as she observes that her father, Ananse wants to marry her off to the local chiefs. Then, she questions the father about his intent. This proves the masculinity in women too.

Within the two texts, the audience also pictures the female gender being restricted from her decision and as a result of this, she is employed as a competent tod for the exploitation of man’s desire by the parents. For instance, Mrs. Bracknell objects Cecily’s feelings for Jack Worthing until she (Mrs. Bracknell) is done with her assessment of Jack’s social stand, and through this aim, Jack’s standard of living is exposed to the knowledge of the audience because Mrs. Bracknell believes that an eighteen-year old girl like Cecily cannot be given to a wretched man who will not maintain or make provision for her needs considering the class she belongs to in the society. While on the part of Anansewa, her father extorts monetary and material gifts from the four local chiefs with the promises of marriage to all of them. When she gets aware of this development, her reaction is suppressed by George Kweku Ananse’s claims that they various funds from the chief have been the sources of her with school fees, but not knowing that Ananse desire is to enrich himself and climb the social ladder with her daughter. Then, it sounds quite obvious that women have been painted with true feminine picture.

Then down to the representation of the male gender, Oscar Wilde informs the audience that men are vulnerable to women’s exploitations. Mrs. Bracknell exploits Jack’s desire for Cecily to know the true identity of Jack Worthing and social class. And she (Mrs. Bracknell) intends to toil with Jack’s desire when she says that Algernom should go ahead to marry Gwendolen without a corresponding approval of Jack’s marriage to Cecily if not that Jack Worthing stands his ground by objecting to Mrs. Bracknell’s partial declaration. Wilde educates his readers that men’s desire can be object of humour when women get involved into the affair on ground. And on the contrary, Sutherland presents man as an agent of greed and deceit, and a setback and an exploiter of his fellow man in the society. George Kweku Ananse’s desire is to excessively enrich himself and attain his materialistic goals through the extortion of funds from the local chiefs whom he never as well given the chance to secure his daughter as wife. Still on this, the sort of masculinity Sutherland places within the local chiefs is perceived to degenerated in approach. None of them is perceptive enough to feel the deception lying within George Kweku Ananse’s conducts and words.

To conclude the aim of this essay, there have been a scrutiny of the means in which gender and sexuality have been presented in the two comic works of Oscar Wilde and Efua Sutherland, pointing out the similarity and variation among the two playwrights. Of course humans vary in trait and composure, but the sort of picture painted about them is dependent on the philosophy of these individual writers.

 

About the Author

Reviews

No reviews yet.

Add Review