Climate Change

Climate Change

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Organic Agriculture as Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategies in Ni

Organic Agriculture as Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Strategies in Ni

Uploaded by Perpetua Nnamuchi

organic agriculture is so far the most promising approach for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Organic agriculture presents a positive example of how farmers can help mitigate climate change and adapt to its predictable and unpredictable impacts. It can as well serve as a benchmark for allocating development resources to climate change adaptation or to measure progress in implementing climate-related multilateral environmental agreements. The benefits of Organic Agriculture regarding climate change can be summarized as follows: Organic agriculture has considerable potential for reducing emission of greenhouse gases Organic agriculture in general requires less fossil fuel per hectare and kilogram of produce to the avoidance of synthetic fertilizers. Organic agriculture aims at improving soil fertility and nitrogen supply by using leguminous crops, crop residues and cover crops. The enhanced soil fertility leads to a stabilization of soil organic matter and in many cases to a sequestration of carbon dioxide into the soils. This in turn increases the soils water retention capacity, thus contributing to better adaptation of organic agriculture under unpredictable climatic conditions with higher temperatures and uncertain precipitation levels. Organic production methods emphasizing soil carbon retention are most likely to withstand climatic challenges particularly in those countries most vulnerable to increased climatic change. Soil erosion, an important source of CO2 losses, is effectively reduced by organic agriculture. Organic agriculture can contribute substantially to agro forestry production system. Organic systems are highly adaptive to climate change due to the application of traditional skills and farmer’s knowledge, soil fertility building techniques and a high degree of diversity.

 
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What the World Must Do to Mitigate Climate Change

What the World Must Do to Mitigate Climate Change

Causes of Climate Change On the Widest Scale; the rate at which energy is lost to space and the rate at which energy is collected from the sun determines the Climate of Earth and the Equilibrium temperature. The energy is saturated around the globe by ocean currents, winds and other mechanisms to alter the climates of various regions. Factors that can alter climate are referred to as “forcing mechanisms” or climate forcing. These entails processes such as variations in the reflectivity or albedo of the oceans and continents, continental drift and mountain-building, variations in the Earth’s Orbit, variations in solar radiation, and lastly changes and continental drift in greenhouse concentrations There are a lot of various climate change feedbacks that can either diminish or amplify the initial forcing. Some aspects of the climate system such as the ice caps and oceans react more hesitantly in response to climate forcing while others respond faster. There are also major threshold factors which when exceeded can result to a rapid change. Forcing mechanisms can either be “external” or “internal”. External Forcing mechanism can be either anthropogenic (for instance; maximized emissions of greenhouse gases) or natural (that is; changes in solar output). Internal forcing mechanisms are natural processes within the climate system itself (that is; the thermohaline circulation) Whether the critical forcing mechanism is external or internal; the reaction of the climate system might be slow (that is; thermal widening of warming ocean water), speedy (that is; an instant cooling as a result of airborne volcanic ash which reflects sunlight) or a combustion (that is; instant loss of albedo in the arctic ocean as sea ice melts as this is followed by more slowly thermal enlargement of the water). Therefore; the climate system can react suddenly but the full reaction to forcing mechanisms might not be completely developed for centuries or a longer period of time.

 
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