Archaeology

Archaeology

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Entries on Archaeology

An Ethno-Archaeologiccal Perspective on Oil Palm Tree (Elaeis Guineensis Jacq) in Old Nsukka Division of Enugu State

An Ethno-Archaeologiccal Perspective on Oil Palm Tree (Elaeis Guineensis Jacq) in Old Nsukka Division of Enugu State

ABSTRACT: Archaeological investigations have revealed that palm oil processing technology was practiced in the Nsukka cultural area of present day Enugu state of Nigeria during the late stone age period , as evidenced from fragments of palm kernels found in the area dating to 2555-130B.C . The oil palm tree therefore is as old as the Settlement of the area by humans. At the birth of every new baby an oil palm tree is dedicated to such a child which is locally known as “Nkwo-lee’. Oil palm tree seems to have been created to meet man’s need in the study area. For there is no tree which in itself has so many uses like the tree since every part is utilized and is of great value. These include the production of timber, palm wine, leaves, basket, soap, palm kernel, pomade, palm oil etc. The tender palm frond “omu” performs numerous functions in old Nsukka Division and Igboland in general. The oil palm tree is one of the major oil producing plants in the area of study and Igboland in general surpassing any other plant in the yielding of oil. The palm tree serves various purposes in the domestic life of the people. It is also a major source of income to a greater proportion of the rural farmers in the study area. Palm oil processing in Old Nsukka Division is an indigenous technology. Palm tree therefore is a blessing of inestimable value to the people of Old Nsukka Division because of its multifarious uses. This paper therefore is designed to bring into perspective the great socio- Economic and cultural importance of oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis) through an ethno-archaeological approach in the study area.

 
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Archaeology and Traditional Mural Painting in Nsukka Area of Northern Igboland

Archaeology and Traditional Mural Painting in Nsukka Area of Northern Igboland

Abstract: It has been observed that most artistic ideas in wood, clay, and metals in Igboland are expressed through traditional mural painting symbols which convey important lexical messages. According to Willis(1987) “the Igbo woman’s perception of all aspects of life and nature and most notably ideas and objects which are held to be particularly important and representative of Igbo culture are translated into visual vocabulary which provides important reference material for designers, art historians, engineers and ethnographers alike”. This paper, therefore, seeks to bring to limelight , how the culture of Nsukka people and Igbo in general is expressed through the study of their traditional architectural wall paintings rendered in thorough naturally made indelible ink of “Uli” (black indigo), “Nzu”(natural clay), “Ufie”(red ochre gotten from plants), charcoal and other natural dyes in the form of leaves. These motifs touch on all aspects of Igbo life and serves as ethnographic evidence for studying the cultural history of the area in the absence of direct core archaeological evidence. The method applied in the course of carrying out this research is ethnographic method. This involves the collection of oral information from the extant members of the community that are knowledgeable in the topic of research. Primary secondary sources of information were used. The primary source of data came from oral tradition collected, while the secondary source came from documented literature on the topic of research. Pictures were also used for clarity sake.

 
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Archaeological Sites as Visitor Attractions

Archaeological Sites as Visitor Attractions

Nigeria is blessed with a plethora of archaeological sites some of which rank among the most exquisite in the world. Unfortunately, however, their potential as visitor attractions have hardly been realized and harnessed. In this paper, therefore, attempts will be made to identify those sites with immense visitor attraction potential and methods will be suggested on how to protect, package and present them to the domestic and international tourist markets

 
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Weaving the Fabric of Archaeological Research in Ugwuele-Uturu Stone Age Site of South-Eastern Nigeria

Weaving the Fabric of Archaeological Research in Ugwuele-Uturu Stone Age Site of South-Eastern Nigeria

The prehistoric site of Ugwuele in Uturu of Abia State was discovered about three decades ago. The state of euphoria associated with this spectacular discovery fuelled a lot of research interest on the site at the initial stages. With the passage of time, however,  the research interest could not be sustained, probably due to a number of seemingly difficult obstacles that needed to be crossed, to enable the original intertia to be regained. In this paper, therefore, we  shall attempt to re-visit the site in order to appraise the progress of work by the Pioneer researchers and also suggest ways of mustering support for research to continue at the site in order to save it from the threats of destruction from other competing interests.

 
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A Preliminary Report on Recent Archaeological Field School on Iron Working Sites in Nsukka Plateau: Onyohor, Ekwegbe and Obimo, Nigeria

A Preliminary Report on Recent Archaeological Field School on Iron Working Sites in Nsukka Plateau: Onyohor, Ekwegbe and Obimo, Nigeria

The history of man dates back to as far as 2.6 – 3.5 million years (Williams et al 1993). Since then, man has interacted with his physical environment. To survive the precarious environment in which he found himself, he has to invent culture. Man‟s first cultural attribute came in the form of tools and implements with which to fight and conquer the environment. This came first inform of stick/wood and stone, which was gradually or rather evolutionarily replaced by iron/metal objects.

 
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Reasons Why People From Developed Countries Dread Undderdocx

Reasons Why People From Developed Countries Dread Undderdocx

Uploaded by Nnaemezie Emeka

Research shows that poor governance, illiteracy, disease and lack of political will are the major factors hindering development. Our government need act now!

 
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