African Traditional Religion

African Traditional Religion

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Entries on African Traditional Religion

The African Novel and the Realist Tradition

The African Novel and the Realist Tradition

Uploaded by ABOKI ASSOCIATES

The assertion by some writers of African origin that African literature is an autonomous entity – separate and apart from all other literatures and therefore necessarily requiring its own literary traditions, models and norms, suggesting that its constituency is separate and radically different from that of European or other literatures, and this as rationale for an African poetics, is at best misleading. This is for the simple reason that literary critical criteria such as plot, setting, symbols, imagery, time and space, point of view and other aesthetic features on the one hand, and literary theoretical concepts such as Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Structuralism, Semiotics, Feminism and other theories on the other hand, cannot be used in reference to any one geographical region of the world. In other words, these critical and theoretical concepts are universal. However, it is valid to refer to a European, American or African literature where the content of the region dominates a given literature. It is to this robust debate that Ferdinand Asoo contributes in The African Novel and the Realist Tradition by subjecting the theory of Realism to the African novel.

 
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Child Education and Parenting in African Traditional Society

Child Education and Parenting in African Traditional Society

Uploaded by BAHITI AND DALILA

Education as a process of acculturation exists in every culture of any people in the world with the aim of meeting the needs of the learner and those of the immediate community as well as the wider society. This process of educating or training the younger generation and gradually integrating them into meaningful and functional adult life does not necessarily mean literacy and is not limited to occurring within the four walls and corners of a classroom. The health and wealth of any nation depend on its educational system and thus no society can rise above its level of education; be it African or European. Charity they say begins at home. This is because the home is the first environment the child finds him/herself. Therefore, the family which is the smallest social unit of the society serves as the base for the success or failure of education of all kinds anywhere in the world.

 
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The Social  Implications of  Traditional African  Performance: The Dual Functions of Akwubaliba Incarnate Being of Igala.

The Social Implications of Traditional African Performance: The Dual Functions of Akwubaliba Incarnate Being of Igala.

ABSTRACT: The Igala worldview emphasizes life, death and life after death. The Igala hold firmly that the dead are not dead. They live in an immortal world where they advocate for the living. The Igala believe that the dead who are now the ancestors can reincarnate and are born again as babies, or may return to the world as masked spirits or incarnate beings. The Akwubaliba incarnate being is one of numerous incarnate beings in Igalaland. In Igala culture, incarnate beings are sacred and sacrosanct. They serve several functions one of which is social control. The Akwubaliba which means locust are young masked spirits or incarnate beings between the ages of ten to thirteen years. The Akwubaliba incarnate beings may number up to two hundred or more. Their appearance usually sends mothers and barren women into different types of psychological and emotional states. The essence of this paper is to explore the reasons for these two groups of women’s emotional and psychological states during the outing of these young incarnate beings and the impact of such emotional and psychological states on the society.

 
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Churchesdocx

Churchesdocx

Taxation is a universal phenomenon. From ancient times, it has been the source of financial support to governments in the running of state affairs all over the world. The laws of the Federal Republic of Nigeria specify the payment of taxes of various forms and shades by all-income earners and entrepreneurs in the country either as individual or as corporate organization. Thus individuals, companies or institutions pay taxes to the various levels of government according to their incomes or assets. Today, unlike before, a hot debate arises on the national media whether religious bodies now emerging in their numbers are also subject to the government‟s tax policies. Religious bodies in general are considered as non income earning and this shows the rationale for their apparent immunity from tax payment in Nigeria. This paper concentrates on whether government should tax churches or not. Admittedly, the recent trend of the formal involvement of many church bodies, denominations or personalities in enterprises with business orientation - school management, industries, financial institutions, article shops etc, calls this seeming immunity to question. Noting the difficulty in defining what is meant by "business orientation" with regard to church enterprises, this paper sees the logic in taxing those church enterprise that are strictly commercial.

 
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Origin of the Igbo People

Origin of the Igbo People

This research work is for more understanding of the history and the meaning of the name IGBO

 
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           the Papacy and the Reformers in an Unhealthy Rivalry in the                       Medieval Church: Its Effect on the Church in Africa

the Papacy and the Reformers in an Unhealthy Rivalry in the Medieval Church: Its Effect on the Church in Africa

Uploaded by Decent Chiamaka

2.4 CONCLUSION Christ’s prayer in John 17:11 being a heartfelt request from the Son to the Father over the multitude He leaves behind is achievable not on the grounds of denominational dislodging or in ecumenism, but on the return to doctrinal and ecclesiastical oneness. This when achieved, would have produced a religion far more powerful economically, politically and spiritually than any other religion of the world known to man.

 
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African Culture as a Basis for Ecumenism

African Culture as a Basis for Ecumenism

A cursory glance at the historical commitment of the Catholic Church towards ecumenism reveals that since 325 AD, beginning with the Ecumenical Council of Nicaea, through the Lateran Ecumenical Council of 1179 to the First and Second Vatican Councils of 1869-1970 and 1962-1965 respectively, amounting to 21 ecumenical councils in the historical evolution of the ecclesia, reveals that the Church, is truly, in a theological sense, „an ecumenical council formed in response to the divine convoking‟; and in fact Beck (1975) wrote that “The Catholic Church as the Church of all would in fact be unfaithful to itself if it were to take the divisions of Christendom simply as a fact about which nothing can be done” (p. 420).

 
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African Culture as a Basis for Ecumenism

African Culture as a Basis for Ecumenism

A cursory glance at the historical commitment of the Catholic Church towards ecumenism reveals that since 325 AD, beginning with the Ecumenical Council of Nicaea, through the Lateran Ecumenical Council of 1179 to the First and Second Vatican Councils of 1869-1970 and 1962-1965 respectively, amounting to 21 ecumenical councils in the historical evolution of the ecclesia, reveals that the Church, is truly, in a theological sense, „an ecumenical council formed in response to the divine convoking‟; and in fact Beck (1975) wrote that “The Catholic Church as the Church of all would in fact be unfaithful to itself if it were to take the divisions of Christendom simply as a fact about which nothing can be done” (p. 420).

 
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 African Culture as a Basis for Ecumenism

African Culture as a Basis for Ecumenism

A cursory glance at the historical commitment of the Catholic Church towards ecumenism reveals that since 325 AD, beginning with the Ecumenical Council of Nicaea, through the Lateran Ecumenical Council of 1179 to the First and Second Vatican Councils of 1869-1970 and 1962-1965 respectively, amounting to 21 ecumenical councils in the historical evolution of the ecclesia, reveals that the Church, is truly, in a theological sense, „an ecumenical council formed in response to the divine convoking‟; and in fact Beck (1975) wrote that “The Catholic Church as the Church of all would in fact be unfaithful to itself if it were to take the divisions of Christendom simply as a fact about which nothing can be done” (p. 420).

 
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The Impact of Ecology in African Traditional Religion

The Impact of Ecology in African Traditional Religion

In the 1970’s the ecological peril facing the world became a huge concern. Indeed, this concern has risen mainly because of the depletion of the earth resources, pollution and sheer destruction and degradation of the environment. Granberg-Michaelson (1992:1) observes that, it has taken the earth summit in Rio (1992) to raise that development as traditionally understood had failed.

 
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The Impact of Ecology in African Traditional Religion

The Impact of Ecology in African Traditional Religion

In the 1970’s the ecological peril facing the world became a huge concern. Indeed, this concern has risen mainly because of the depletion of the earth resources, pollution and sheer destruction and degradation of the environment.

 
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