African Studies

African Studies

7 Entries

Entries on African Studies

Leadership, Policy and Economic Development in Nigeria and Singapore: A Comparative (1960 - 1990)

Leadership, Policy and Economic Development in Nigeria and Singapore: A Comparative (1960 - 1990)

Uploaded by Chambers Umezulike

Leadership, Policy and Economic Development in Nigeria and Singapore: a Comparative (1960 - 1990) is a sweeping comparison of Nigeria and Singapore on their economic development performances. It further critically assesses how leaderships in the two countries were able to influence these performances through their economic policies and developmental efforts. Particular emphasis is placed on between 1960 and 1990; although post 1990 is briefly captured but strictly on economic policies and performances of successive governments. This book elementrifies foundational reasons why the two countries have divergent economic development statistics despite starting with homologous economic statistics in the 1960s, with cross-national opportunities and constraints. It reveals how the two different and newly independent countries in the 60s followed different paths toward nation building. The correlations between leadership, economic policymaking and implementation, and economic development are established. The period of 1960 to 1990 played key, formative roles in the both countries’ economic development narratives. Within the three decades, Singapore was transformed from a third to first world country while Nigeria was caught up with International Monetary Fund’s Structural Adjustment Program. This Comparative Study captures cross-national differences and finds out lessons Nigeria can learn from Singapore in pursuing an inclusive and sustainable economic development. This book is a fitting primary source for students, scholars and researchers of development studies, public policy, development economics, leadership, governance and regional development.

 
0.0 (0 reviews)
The African Novel and the Realist Tradition

The African Novel and the Realist Tradition

Uploaded by ABOKI ASSOCIATES

The assertion by some writers of African origin that African literature is an autonomous entity – separate and apart from all other literatures and therefore necessarily requiring its own literary traditions, models and norms, suggesting that its constituency is separate and radically different from that of European or other literatures, and this as rationale for an African poetics, is at best misleading. This is for the simple reason that literary critical criteria such as plot, setting, symbols, imagery, time and space, point of view and other aesthetic features on the one hand, and literary theoretical concepts such as Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, Structuralism, Semiotics, Feminism and other theories on the other hand, cannot be used in reference to any one geographical region of the world. In other words, these critical and theoretical concepts are universal. However, it is valid to refer to a European, American or African literature where the content of the region dominates a given literature. It is to this robust debate that Ferdinand Asoo contributes in The African Novel and the Realist Tradition by subjecting the theory of Realism to the African novel.

 
0.0 (0 reviews)
Child Education and Parenting in African Traditional Society

Child Education and Parenting in African Traditional Society

Uploaded by BAHITI AND DALILA

Education as a process of acculturation exists in every culture of any people in the world with the aim of meeting the needs of the learner and those of the immediate community as well as the wider society. This process of educating or training the younger generation and gradually integrating them into meaningful and functional adult life does not necessarily mean literacy and is not limited to occurring within the four walls and corners of a classroom. The health and wealth of any nation depend on its educational system and thus no society can rise above its level of education; be it African or European. Charity they say begins at home. This is because the home is the first environment the child finds him/herself. Therefore, the family which is the smallest social unit of the society serves as the base for the success or failure of education of all kinds anywhere in the world.

 
0.0 (0 reviews)
The Aro and the Concept of Aro-Okigbo: Facts and Fallacies of a Historic Igbo Hegemony.

The Aro and the Concept of Aro-Okigbo: Facts and Fallacies of a Historic Igbo Hegemony.

ABSTRACT: The Aro sub- culture group of the Nigeria no doubt played important role in pre-colonial period as oracular agents woven in slave trade. They were mainly slave merchants whose oracle played the role of a spiritual conduit through which its unsuspecting client were sold into slavery. In other words, this dreaded oracle, Ibinu-Ukpabi, also known as the long juju, which is situated at Arochukwu played the dastardly role of sending those who appeared before it but could not pay themselves through for freedom into slavery. Ironically, during the hey-days of the British colonial activities, the activities of the aro became elevated by the simple omission of historical facts to the status of an Igbo civilization. By this simple act of omission, the Aro soon assumed the status of a superior socio-political cast among the Igbo. This obvious misrepresentation was to lead to a stream of intellectual controversy among Igbo scholars and local political partisans. This resulting controversy which was originally rooted in C.G. Seligman’s hamitic hypothesis, was expounded by a notable colonial anthropologist - - H.F. Mathews and later appropriated by succeeding Igbo scholars of Aro school of thought. It borders on the claim of indigenous pre- colonial imperialism over the rest Igbo group by the Aro. The present work explores the facts, myths and probabilities of this concept of a racially superior branch of the Igbo culture group as represented by the Nri and Aro. In the process of exploring the evidence, a number of dependent historical and hypothetical question were raised. This is primary query which will most probably strike the mind in the context of primeval Igbo origins and identity? In other words...

 
0.0 (0 reviews)
The Early Colonial Period and the Twenty

The Early Colonial Period and the Twenty

Abstract: Different  aspects  of  Igbo  culture,  especially  fashion  have  been  in  a  state  of  flux  since the  colonial  times.  Much  of  what  constituted  the  ancient  Igbo  material  culture  could not  survive  the  colonial  period.  For  instance,  traditional  Igbo  fashion  which  promoted nudity,  body  ornamentation,  title  regalia  and  decorative  hairdos  among  others  have been  somewhat  eroded  by  foreign  influences.  Though  handful  of  scholars  and  artists have  prolonged the memories of some  fashion items or style through their  literary  and creative  works,  greater  percentage  of  the  younger  generation  of  the  Igbo  seem completely  ignorant  of  the  forms  and  functions  of  what  should  have  been  Igbo  cultural heritage.  The  contemporary  voguish  fashion  of  the  Igbos  is  patterned  after  western styles.  This  paper  not  only  exhumes  some  outmoded  Igbo  fashion  but  also  attempts  a succinct  comparative  analysis  of  forms  and  significances  of  the  early  colonial  period and  the  twenty-first  century  Igbo  fashion.  This  is  done  in  order  to  briefly  highlight  the formal  and  functional  distinctiveness  of  the  two  modes  as  well  as  the  changes  in  fashion and struggles over identity in Igboland.  

 
0.0 (0 reviews)
Ikenga: International Journal of African Studies, Vol. 11, Numbers 1&2 September, 2010

Ikenga: International Journal of African Studies, Vol. 11, Numbers 1&2 September, 2010

IKENGA: International Journal of African Studies, Vol. 11, Numbers 1&2 September, 2010

 
0.0 (0 reviews)
Ikenga: International Journal of Institute of African Studies (Vol. 14, No 1)

Ikenga: International Journal of Institute of African Studies (Vol. 14, No 1)

Vol. 14, No 1 of Ikenga Journal, containing various research articles.

 
0.0 (0 reviews)